© Bere Regis Village  2003  -  2017

Bere Regis Manor

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THE MANOR of Bere Regis  was   a   large   one,   comprising   almost   the   whole   of   the   present   day   parish,   except   for   Shitterton   and   Hyde   which   were   separate   small   manors   in   their own   right. As   referred   to   before,   it   had   been   one   of   the   royal   manors   in   Saxon   times,   at   least   before   the   year   978,   and   continued   as   such   up   to   and during   King   John's   reign   (1199-1216)   when   he   stayed   here   on   at   least   16   occasions. After   King   John's   death   it   passed   automatically   to   King   Henry III (1216-1272), but in 1259 it ceased to be royal demesne when it was granted to Simon de Mcntfort, Earl of Leicester.    Simon   de   Montfort   was   thus   the   first   private   owner   of   the   manor   and   a   word   should   perhaps   be   said   about   him.   He   was   a   most   powerful   and influential   person   in   national   affairs   in   both   England   and   France,   and   was   as   a   result   continually   either   in   or   out   of   favour   with   the   king.   In   1238   he married   Eleanor,   the   king's   sister,   and   then   began   a   lengthy   legal   argument   over   the   form   and   amount   of   the   marriage   settlement,   which   was eventually   resolved   when   the   king   granted   Simon   ten   English   manors,   one   of   these   being   the   manor   of   Bere   in   Dorset.   it   would   appear   that   Simon de   Montfcrt's   officials   took   possession   of   the   manor   in   what   may   be   termed   indecent   haste,   as   the   king   was   required   to   intervene   on   behalf   of   the Abbess   of   Tarrant   whose   early   crops   were   being   seized   by   Simon's   bailiffs.   Simon   de   Montfort's   chief   claim   to   fame   lies   in   his   successful   efforts towards   the   reformation   of   the   English   parliament,   and   he   is   therefore   often   considered   as   its   founder.   In   1265   when   he   led   an   uprising   of   barons against the king, he and his supporters were defeated at the battle of Evesham when Simon de Montfort himself was killed.    After   Montfort's   death   all   his   property   was   reclaimed   by   the   Crown,   so   that   the   manor   of   Bere   again   became   royal   demesne   for   four   years,   until 1269   when   it   was   granted   to   the   king's   brother   Edmund,   Earl   of   Lancaster   and   his   heirs.   Later,   however,   the   manor   appears   to   have   formed   part   of the estates of the Earls of Hereford, under whom the Turbervilles became tenants and hence lords of the manor. The   Turberville   family   have   been   dealt   with   more   fully   in   the   previous   chapter,   and   for   most   of   the   time   they   were   not   the   sole   possessors   of   the manor,   for   the   successive   Abbesses   of   Tarrant   held   a   moiety   (half   the   rents   and   profits)   of   it   until   the   dissolution   of   the   abbey   in   1539.   In   1547 Robert   Turberville   purchased   the   moiety   which   had   belonged   to   the   abbey,   thereby   procuring   the   whole   manor   for   himself   and   his   heirs. Although Tarrant   Abbey's   moiety   is   recorded   as   being   granted   by   Edmund   the   king's   brother   when   he   received   the   manor   in   1269,   this   was   probably confirmation   of   an   existing   arrangement,   as   the   Abbess   of   Tarrant   appears   to   have   already   had   some   claim   on   the   manor   in   1259   when   it   was granted to Simon de Montfort.    Tarrant Abbey   was   situated   at   what   is   now   Tarrant   Crawford,   the   southernmost   of   the   Tarrant   villages,   near   Spetisbury,   and   was   founded   in   1230 for   Cistercian   nuns.   Its   309   years   of   history   seem   to   have   been   uneventful,   and   when   it   was   surrendered   at   the   Dissolution   in   1539,   it   was   the second   largest   monastic   establishment   in   Dorset   with   20   nuns. The   last   abbess,   Margaret   Russell,   was   given   a   pension   and   may   well   have   retired to Bere Regis, for in her will dated 1567, she desired to be buried in this church. In   1291,   the   abbess's   moiety   in   rents   from   the   manor   of   Bere   amounted   to   £16   5s.   lOd.,   and   in   1293   she   claimed   to   have   a   moiety   of   a   "fair, market,   free   warren,   and   the   whole   forest   of   Bere."   By   1535   the   value   of   her   moiety   of   the   manor   had   increased   to   £29.   12s.   2d.,   as   this   extract from the Valor Ecclesiasticus of that year shows: Manor cf Bere, worth per annum, namely in rents of assize .... £21 1s 6d. In demesne lands to farm at will, namely in uncertain rents: wheat, 9 quarters 6 bushels ......................... £2 12s. Od. barley, 6 quarters. 6 bushels .......................... 18s. Od. oats. 12 quarters ............................. 16s. Od.-£ 4 6s. Od. In pasture for 600 rams in the occupation of the abbess, per annum ........ £2 10s. 0d. In profits at the fairs at Wodeburyhyll, within the said manor, communibus annis ......... £2 0s. 0d. In profits of courts, namely in heriots, fines and other perquisites, communibus annis ....... 16s. 8d. Total £30 14s. 2d. And in rents, resolute to the Sheriff of Dorset, at his tourn, held at the Cross of Bere, issuing out of the aforesaid manor of Bere annually ..................... 12s. Od. And in fees to Roger Gye, bailiff of the same manor of Bere annually .......1Os. Od. Total £ 1 2s. Od. This   account   therefore   shows   an   income   of   £30.   14s.   2d.   less   an   expenditure   of   £1.   2s.   Od.   showing   the   abbess   to   have   made   a   profit   on   the manor of £29. 12s. 2d. Another account of 1539 shows the income as follows: Rents of free tenants .................……….. 2s. 4d. of customary tenants .. ...............………………..………… £15 18s. 4d. for the farm of the capital mansion, manor, land etc......... £ 8 16s. 6d. for the farm of demesne land ........................... £ 5 17s. Od. and from perquisites of court ....................………... 19s. 8d. Total £31 13s. lOd. A   family   named   Bridport   or   de   Bridport   (originally   from   the   Dorset   town   of   that   name)   seem   to   have   been   concerned   with   property   in   Bere   at   an early   period,   and   to   have   been   lessees   of   the Abbess   of Tarrant.   John   de   Bridport   who   had   been   one   of   the   burgesses   of   Bridport   in   1313   and   who was   later   knight   of   the   shire   for   Dorset   in   1322,   is   mentioned   as   lord   of   the   township   of   Kyngesbere   in   1316. Also,   a   charter   of   uncertain   date   was granted to Isabel, the wife of John Brideport, to hold a three days fair in Bere. The   Turberviile   family   are   mentioned   in   connection   with   Bere   as   early   as   1202,   but   it   is   not   known   exactly   when   they   became   lords   of   the   manor. However,   John   de   Turberville   is   known   to   have   been   lord   of   the   manor   in   1274,   and   successive   heads   of   the   family   remained   so   until   1704   when the   last   male   heir,   Thomas   Turbervilie,   died.   His   wife   and   three   daughters   continued   to   act   as   "ladies   of   the   manor"   until   the   estates   were purchased   by   Henry   Drax   in   1733.   The   manor   still   remains   in   the   possession   of   that   family,   although   many   smaller   portions   have   now   been disposed of to individual owners. A   few   years   after   acquiring   the   manor,   Henry   Drax   commissioned   a   famous   surveyor   and   map   maker,   Isaac   Taylor   of   Ross,   Herefordshire   to survey   the   whole   of   his   estates   at   Morden,   Charborough   and   Bere.   This   survey   took   four   years   to   prepare,   from   1773   to   1777, and   the   Bere   manor   occupies   eight   large   scale   maps.   Every   parcel   of   land   is   shown   in   detail   together   with   its   area   and   the   name of   each   tenant,   and   where   in   the   village   itself   the   plots   of   land   tend   to   be   smaller,   there   is   an   accompanying`terrier'   or   list   of properties   and   tenants.   The   three   large   open   fields   north   of   the   village   were   divided   into   strips   rather   like   allotment   gardens   and cultivated   in   three-yearly   rotation,   and   the   boundaries   between   them   can   still   be   readily   identified.   The   maps   are   surprisingly accurate,   and   as   many   features   which   still   exist   can   be   readily   recognized,   it   has   been   possible   to   condense   the   information   on to one smaller scale map with the aid of modern ordnance maps. See the map here.         The   unfenced   divisions   of   the   three   open   fields   (East   Field,   Middle   Field   and   West   Field)   have   been   omitted   for   clarity.   Where   portions   of   the   open fields   were   on   steepish   slopes   the   strips   were   usually   arranged   to   run   with   the   contours   of   the   hill,   and   in   such   cases   centuries   of   ploughing caused   the   strips   to   become   terraces   with   dividing   banks   between,   known   as   `butts'.   Such   an   example   occurs   in   the   existing   small   field   west   of barrow hill, where a tongue of `Middle Field' reached down to the present Tower Hill, and in which the `butts' can still be clearly seen. One   of   the   maps   showing   "the   town   of   Beare   Regis"   is   of   particular   interest   as   it   gives   a   large   scale   representation of   the   village   as   it   was   before   the   serious   fire   of   1788.   For   this   reason   it   has   been   reproduced   separately   to   a   larger scale, and is drawn from a combination of modern ordnance maps and Isaac Taylor's map - see the map below -             Bere Regis in 1777 There   are   many   features   of   interest,   but   perhaps   the   most   notable   is   the   road   system   which   lacks   the   present   day   Poole   and   Dorchester   Roads, not   constructed   in   the   form   in   which   we   know   them   until   1840.   All   routes   eastward   were   by   way   of   Townsend,   Woodbury   Hill   and   the   Wareham Road, and the main westerly route was by way of Shitterton and the present Dark Lane. The   manor   house   stood   in   what   is   now   Court   Green   immediately   south   west   of   the   present   Court   Farm   cottages   which   appear   to   have   been adapted   and   rebuilt   from   the   east   wing   and   outbuildings   of   the   old   house. The   original   manor   house   would   have   been   built   during   the Anglo   Saxon period   when   the   village   itself   was   first   established,   and   was   the   building   in   which   Queen   Elfrida   stayed   in   978.   It   then   probably   remained   in   more or   less   its   original   state   until   King   John's   time   (1199   -   1216)   when   it   was   repaired   and   considerably   enlarged   to   provide   suitable   accommodation for   him   and   his   court   on   sixteen   occasions   during   his   reign. At   some   time   during   the   13th   century   it   became   the   residence   of   the   Turberville   family as   lords   of   the   manor   until   the   extinction   of   that   family   in   1704,   although   Thomas   Turberville's   widow   and   daughters   who   survived   him   presumably continued   to   live   in   the   house   until   the   manor   was   sold   in   1733.   During   this   period   from   the   13th   to   the   18th   centuries   the   house   underwent   many alterations   and   extensions   to   say   nothing   of   repairs   and   rebuilding.   In   King   John's   time   manor   houses   were   usually   in   the   form   of   a   group   of detached   rooms,   and   this   period   of   some   five   centuries   would   have   seen   the   house   develop   into   the   single   irregular   block   which   it   had   become   in later   times.   When   the   manor   was   sold   to   Henry   Drax   in   1733,   he   and   his   successors   being   already   established   at   Charborough,   the   Bere   manor house   ceased   to   be   used   as   such   from   that   date.   Consequently   the   state   of   the   building   rapidly   deteriorated,   and   although   it   was   still   standing   in 1803, it had disappeared by 1844. From   Isaac Taylor's   1777   map   (previously   shown)   the   house   appears   to   have   been   basically   quadrangular   with   a   central   courtyard,   and   according to   the   1662   hearth   tax   returns   it   had   16   fireplaces.   There   is   now   nothing   to   be   seen   above   ground   on   the   site   (though   doubtless   the   foundations still exist under the turf) but it is fortunate that two old drawings of the house still exist, and they are reproduced here. The   top   one   appeared   as   an   engraving   from   an   earlier   drawing   showing   the   west   side,   in   the   1861   edition   of   Hutchins History   of   Dorset,   and   the   bottom   one   is   an   original   ink   and   wash   drawing   of   the   eastern   side,   in   1786,   by   J.   B.   Knight   in the   Dorset   County   Museum.   In   the   second   drawing   an   outbuilding   on   stone   staddles   which   still   exists   can   be   identified   and helps   in   locating   the   position   of   the   main   building.   When   Hutchins   visited   the   house   in   about   1770,   he   described   it   as   "of stone,   large   but   irregular".   The   arms   of   Thomas   Turberville   who   died   in   1587   appeared   on   part   of   the   west   front,   denoting   that   this   portion   had been   added   or   rebuilt   during   his   lifetime,   and   the   date   1648   appeared   below   a   window   at   the   back   of   the   house.   The   hall   or   principal   room   was described as "a pretty large room," and on the walls were hung the various arms of the family. After   the   house   had   collapsed   or   been   pulled   down   early   in   the   nineteenth   century,   a   considerable   pile   of   rubble   must   have   remained   on   the   site, and   seems   to   have   been   used   as   a   quarry   for   much   of   the   building   activity   in   the   neighbourhood,   as   stones   from   the   house may still be found in various parts of the village, besides many more which must be built in and now out of sight.            
L    Bere Regis in 1777 L L L
© Bere Regis Village  2003  -  2017

Bere Regis Manor

Bere Regis Village Website
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THE   MANOR   of   Bere   Regis    was   a   large   one,   comprising   almost   the whole   of   the   present   day   parish,   except   for   Shitterton   and   Hyde   which were   separate   small   manors   in   their   own   right. As   referred   to   before,   it had   been   one   of   the   royal   manors   in   Saxon   times,   at   least   before   the year   978,   and   continued   as   such   up   to   and   during   King   John's   reign (1199-1216)   when   he   stayed   here   on   at   least   16   occasions. After   King John's   death   it   passed   automatically   to   King   Henry   III   (1216-1272),   but in   1259   it   ceased   to   be   royal   demesne   when   it   was   granted   to   Simon de Mcntfort, Earl of Leicester.    Simon   de   Montfort   was   thus   the   first   private   owner   of   the   manor   and   a word   should   perhaps   be   said   about   him.   He   was   a   most   powerful   and influential   person   in   national   affairs   in   both   England   and   France,   and was   as   a   result   continually   either   in   or   out   of   favour   with   the   king.   In 1238   he   married   Eleanor,   the   king's   sister,   and   then   began   a   lengthy legal   argument   over   the   form   and   amount   of   the   marriage   settlement, which    was    eventually    resolved    when    the    king    granted    Simon    ten English   manors,   one   of   these   being   the   manor   of   Bere   in   Dorset.   it would   appear   that   Simon   de   Montfcrt's   officials   took   possession   of   the manor    in    what    may    be    termed    indecent    haste,    as    the    king    was required   to   intervene   on   behalf   of   the   Abbess   of   Tarrant   whose   early crops   were   being   seized   by   Simon's   bailiffs.   Simon   de   Montfort's   chief claim   to   fame   lies   in   his   successful   efforts   towards   the   reformation   of the   English   parliament,   and   he   is   therefore   often   considered   as   its founder.   In   1265   when   he   led   an   uprising   of   barons   against   the   king, he   and   his   supporters   were   defeated   at   the   battle   of   Evesham   when Simon de Montfort himself was killed.   After   Montfort's   death   all   his   property   was   reclaimed   by   the   Crown,   so that   the   manor   of   Bere   again   became   royal   demesne   for   four   years, until   1269   when   it   was   granted   to   the   king's   brother   Edmund,   Earl   of Lancaster   and   his   heirs.   Later,   however,   the   manor   appears   to   have formed   part   of   the   estates   of   the   Earls   of   Hereford,   under   whom   the Turbervilles became tenants and hence lords of the manor. The   Turberville   family   have   been   dealt   with   more   fully   in   the   previous chapter,   and   for   most   of   the   time   they   were   not   the   sole   possessors   of the   manor,   for   the   successive   Abbesses   of   Tarrant   held   a   moiety   (half the   rents   and   profits)   of   it   until   the   dissolution   of   the   abbey   in   1539.   In 1547   Robert   Turberville   purchased   the   moiety   which   had   belonged   to the   abbey,   thereby   procuring   the   whole   manor   for   himself   and   his heirs. Although Tarrant Abbey's   moiety   is   recorded   as   being   granted   by Edmund   the   king's   brother   when   he   received   the   manor   in   1269,   this was   probably   confirmation   of   an   existing   arrangement,   as   the   Abbess of   Tarrant   appears   to   have   already   had   some   claim   on   the   manor   in 1259 when it was granted to Simon de Montfort. Tarrant   Abbey    was    situated    at    what    is    now    Tarrant    Crawford,    the southernmost    of    the    Tarrant    villages,    near    Spetisbury,    and    was founded   in   1230   for   Cistercian   nuns.   Its   309   years   of   history   seem   to have   been   uneventful,   and   when   it   was   surrendered   at   the   Dissolution in   1539,   it   was   the   second   largest   monastic   establishment   in   Dorset with   20   nuns.   The   last   abbess,   Margaret   Russell,   was   given   a   pension and   may   well   have   retired   to   Bere   Regis,   for   in   her   will   dated   1567,   she desired to be buried in this church. In    1291,    the    abbess's    moiety    in    rents    from    the    manor    of    Bere amounted   to   £16   5s.   lOd.,   and   in   1293   she   claimed   to   have   a   moiety   of a   "fair,   market,   free   warren,   and   the   whole   forest   of   Bere."   By   1535   the value   of   her   moiety   of   the   manor   had   increased   to   £29.   12s.   2d.,   as this extract from the Valor Ecclesiasticus of that year shows: Manor cf Bere, worth per annum, namely in rents of assize .... £21 1s 6d. In demesne lands to farm at will, namely in uncertain rents: wheat, 9 quarters 6 bushels ......................... £2 12s. Od. barley, 6 quarters. 6 bushels .......................... 18s. Od. oats. 12 quarters ............................. 16s. Od.-£ 4 6s. Od. In pasture for 600 rams in the occupation of the abbess, per annum ........ £2 10s. 0d. In profits at the fairs at Wodeburyhyll, within the said manor, communibus annis ......... £2 0s. 0d. In profits of courts, namely in heriots, fines and other perquisites, communibus annis ....... 16s. 8d. Total £30 14s. 2d. And in rents, resolute to the Sheriff of Dorset, at his tourn, held at the Cross of Bere, issuing out of the aforesaid manor of Bere annually ..................... 12s. Od. And in fees to Roger Gye, bailiff of the same manor of Bere annually .......1Os. Od. Total £ 1 2s. Od. This   account   therefore   shows   an   income   of   £30.   14s.   2d.   less   an expenditure   of   £1.   2s.   Od.   showing   the   abbess   to   have   made   a   profit on   the   manor   of   £29.   12s.   2d.   Another   account   of   1539   shows   the income as follows: Rents of free tenants ................... 2s. 4d. of customary tenants .. ................... £15 18s. 4d. for the farm of the capital mansion, manor, land etc......... £ 8 16s. 6d. for the farm of demesne land ........................... £ 5 17s. Od. and from perquisites of court ......................... 19s. 8d. Total £31 13s. Od. A   family   named   Bridport   or   de   Bridport   (originally   from   the   Dorset   town of   that   name)   seem   to   have   been   concerned   with   property   in   Bere   at an   early   period,   and   to   have   been   lessees   of   the   Abbess   of   Tarrant. John   de   Bridport   who   had   been   one   of   the   burgesses   of   Bridport   in 1313   and   who   was   later   knight   of   the   shire   for   Dorset   in   1322,   is mentioned   as   lord   of   the   township   of   Kyngesbere   in   1316.   Also,   a charter    of    uncertain    date    was    granted    to    Isabel,    the    wife    of    John Brideport, to hold a three days fair in Bere. The   Turberviile   family   are   mentioned   in   connection   with   Bere   as   early as   1202,   but   it   is   not   known   exactly   when   they   became   lords   of   the manor.   However,   John   de Turberville   is   known   to   have   been   lord   of   the manor   in   1274,   and   successive   heads   of   the   family   remained   so   until 1704   when   the   last   male   heir,   Thomas   Turbervilie,   died.   His   wife   and three   daughters   continued   to   act   as   "ladies   of   the   manor"   until   the estates    were    purchased    by    Henry    Drax    in    1733.    The    manor    still remains    in    the    possession    of    that    family,    although    many    smaller portions have now been disposed of to individual owners. A   few   years   after   acquiring   the   manor,   Henry   Drax   commissioned   a famous   surveyor   and   map   maker,   Isaac   Taylor   of   Ross,   Herefordshire to   survey   the   whole   of   his   estates   at   Morden,   Charborough   and   Bere. This   survey   took   four   years   to   prepare,   from   1773   to   1777,   and   the Bere   manor   occupies   eight   large   scale   maps.   Every   parcel   of   land   is shown   in   detail   together   with   its   area   and   the   name   of   each   tenant, and   where   in   the   village   itself   the   plots   of   land   tend   to be   smaller,   there   is   an   accompanying`terrier'   or   list   of properties   and   tenants.   The   three   large   open   fields north   of   the   village   were   divided   into   strips   rather   like allotment    gardens    and    cultivated    in    three-yearly rotation,   and   the   boundaries   between   them   can   still be    readily    identified.    The    maps    are    surprisingly accurate,   and   as   many   features   which   still   exist   can be     readily     recognized,     it     has     been     possible     to     condense     the information    on    to    one    smaller    scale    map    with    the    aid    of    modern ordnance maps. See the map above.         The   unfenced   divisions   of   the   three   open   fields   (East   Field,   Middle Field   and   West   Field)   have   been   omitted   for   clarity.   Where   portions   of the    open    fields    were    on    steepish    slopes    the    strips    were    usually arranged    to    run    with    the    contours    of    the    hill,    and    in    such    cases centuries    of    ploughing    caused    the    strips    to    become    terraces    with dividing   banks   between,   known   as   `butts'.   Such   an   example   occurs   in the   existing   small   field   west   of   barrow   hill,   where   a   tongue   of   `Middle Field'   reached   down   to   the   present   Tower   Hill,   and   in   which   the   `butts' can still be clearly seen.    One   of   the   maps   showing   "the   town   of   Beare   Regis"   is   of   particular interest     as     it     gives     a     large     scale representation   of   the   village   as   it   was before   the   serious   fire   of   1788.   For   this reason      it      has      been      reproduced separately    to    a    larger    scale,    and    is drawn    from    a    combination    of    modern ordnance maps and Isaac Taylor's map - see the map below -      There   are   many   features   of   interest,   but   perhaps   the   most   notable   is the   road   system   which   lacks   the   present   day   Poole   and   Dorchester Roads,   not   constructed   in   the   form   in   which   we   know   them   until   1840. All   routes   eastward   were   by   way   of   Townsend,   Woodbury   Hill   and   the Wareham   Road,   and   the   main   westerly   route   was   by   way   of   Shitterton and the present Dark Lane. The   manor   house   stood   in   what   is   now   Court   Green   immediately   south west   of   the   present   Court   Farm   cottages   which   appear   to   have   been adapted   and   rebuilt   from   the   east   wing   and   outbuildings   of   the   old house.   The   original   manor   house   would   have   been   built   during   the Anglo   Saxon   period   when   the   village   itself   was   first   established,   and was   the   building   in   which   Queen   Elfrida   stayed   in   978.   It   then   probably remained   in   more   or   less   its   original   state   until   King   John's   time   (1199   - 1216)    when    it    was    repaired    and    considerably    enlarged    to    provide suitable   accommodation   for   him   and   his   court   on   sixteen   occasions during   his   reign.   At   some   time   during   the   13th   century   it   became   the residence   of   the   Turberville   family   as   lords   of   the   manor   until   the extinction   of   that   family   in   1704,   although   Thomas   Turberville's   widow and   daughters   who   survived   him   presumably   continued   to   live   in   the house   until   the   manor   was   sold   in   1733.   During   this   period   from   the 13th   to   the   18th   centuries   the   house   underwent   many   alterations   and extensions   to   say   nothing   of   repairs   and   rebuilding.   In   King   John's   time manor   houses   were   usually   in   the   form   of   a   group   of   detached   rooms, and   this   period   of   some   five   centuries   would   have   seen   the   house develop   into   the   single   irregular   block   which   it   had   become   in   later times.   When   the   manor   was   sold   to   Henry   Drax   in   1733,   he   and   his successors   being   already   established   at   Charborough,   the   Bere   manor house   ceased   to   be   used   as   such   from   that   date.   Consequently   the state    of    the    building    rapidly    deteriorated,    and    although    it    was    still standing in 1803, it had disappeared by 1844. From   Isaac   Taylor's   1777   map   (previously   shown)   the   house   appears to   have   been   basically   quadrangular   with   a   central   courtyard,   and according   to   the   1662   hearth   tax   returns   it   had   16   fireplaces.   There   is now   nothing   to   be   seen   above   ground   on   the site   (though   doubtless   the   foundations   still   exist under   the   turf)   but   it   is   fortunate   that   two   old drawings   of   the   house   still   exist,   and   they   are reproduced here. The    top    one    appeared    as    an    engraving    from    an    earlier    drawing showing    the    west    side,    in    the    1861    edition    of    Hutchins    History    of Dorset,   and   the   bottom   one   is   an   original   ink   and wash   drawing   of   the   eastern   side,   in   1786,   by   J. B.   Knight   in   the   Dorset   County   Museum.   In   the second   drawing   an   outbuilding   on   stone   staddles which   still   exists   can   be   identified   and   helps   in locating   the   position   of   the   main   building.   When   Hutchins   visited   the house   in   about   1770,   he   described   it   as   "of   stone,   large   but   irregular". The   arms   of   Thomas   Turberville   who   died   in   1587   appeared   on   part   of the   west   front,   denoting   that   this   portion   had   been   added   or   rebuilt during   his   lifetime,   and   the   date   1648   appeared   below   a   window   at   the back   of   the   house.   The   hall   or   principal   room   was   described   as   "a pretty   large   room,"   and   on   the   walls   were   hung   the   various   arms   of   the family. After    the    house    had    collapsed    or    been    pulled    down    early    in    the nineteenth   century,   a   considerable   pile   of   rubble   must   have   remained on   the   site,   and   seems   to   have   been   used   as   a   quarry   for   much   of   the building   activity   in   the   neighbourhood,   as   stones   from   the   house   may still   be   found   in   various   parts   of   the   village,   besides   many   more   which must be built in and now out of sight.            
L    Bere Regis in 1777 L L L