Bere Regis Village website

St. John the Baptist Church

Historical photographs

Bere Regis Church in about 1900 This fine photograph of the church was taken by Walter Pouncy from the Court Green field across South Brook road. When compared with the church photo taken in the 1860s one can see the new windows at the east end of the South Aisle and the Chancel. Of particular interest also is the size and height of the yew trees planted in the churchyard. Their growth over the next one hundred years has helped to date many photographs in which they appear. Courtesy of John Pitfield
Click / tap image for a larger view Click / tap yellow circle for a larger view All large images appear in a new tab
Church Restoration, Bere Regis in 1875 Again a rather poor image, but one sufficiently unusual for inclusion. This view is from the nave and looking toward the chancel, and the workmen are obviously standing still for the photograph. Indoor photography was certainly a novelty at this time, although it seems that the south aisle roof is off at this time. Total expense of the work carried out on the church in 1875 amounted to 5,090 pounds. This picture was probably taken on the same day as the picture of the West Street Post Office. Courtesy of John Pitfield
Bere Regis Church in 1930 Neatly trimmed Yew trees! Click for the full sized image and see if you can read the sign on the bottom right of the photograph - email us if you can! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Church in the 1860's Probably taken by J.W. Boswell, the village photographer in the 1860s, it shows the church before the restoration in 1875. The two biggest differences before and after restoration are the tops of the two east-facing windows in this view. The south aisle has a square-top window and the chancel window has vertical tracery. Compare this with the next picture taken after 1875. Meanwhile in the right foreground are the out- buildings at the rear of the village brewery in operation from the mid-19th Century, when a gallon of beer would cost one shilling. Courtesy of John Pitfield
The Turberville Chapel & Tombs The Turberville family was made famous by Thomas Hardys book, 'Tess of the D'urbervilles'. Bere Regis is his fabled 'Kingsbere'. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Nave of St. John the Baptist Church around 1912 From the writer of this postcard, "The glory of the church is its timber roof which is gorgeous with the most elaborate carvings." The public sentiment hasn't changed since those musings over 90 years ago... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
St. John The Baptist Church West Window & Font Our lighting is slightly less conspicuous these days! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Nave If you look very closely on the full size image you can even read which hymns & Psalms they had been using! The pattern on the Altar cloth could also give you a hint about what time of year it was. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Looking towards the Nave Look at the wonderful symmetry in the architecture of this church. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Roof Without doubt, the roof, erected by Cardinal Morton, is the highlight of our lovely Church. The 12 Apostles look down on the congregation like 12 indoor beatific gargoyles. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from the South East As the postcard writer noted about the Church, "one of the most beautiful in the county". No arguments there! Note the distinctive tree in the background. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Court Green Notice the brewery to the right of the photograph. That road in front of the Church is somewhat busier now! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Court Green This photograph clearly shows the field that the Church used to look out onto. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The 'D'Urberville' Tomb Me thinks the postcard maker is getting a bit carried away with his Thomas Hardy interest. This is actually the Turberville Family tomb! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Southbrook Notice the meadow & gardens the Church looks out over. An interesting example of an early coloured photograph. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Roof Quite a piece of workmanship considering it was constructed in 1485! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Methodist Chapel, 1890 This fine photograph, taken shortly after completion of the replacement building, was made from a 6.5" x 4.75" glass plate. In 1931 a schoolroom was added at the other, East, end, but in April 1962 the building was sold to a Builders Firm for use as a carpentry workshop. During the 1960s and 1970s the walls were adorned with many pictures and illustrations that the original purpose of the building would not have envisaged. Demolition finally came in the late 1980s to make way for new building developments and housing. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Methodist Chapel in about 1880 Built in 1828 for £120, when the Methodists split from the other church in the village and at a time when various groups worshipped in several different buildings. The description of this post-card view says that this was The First Wesleyan Church, and it was certainly the first in the Dorchester circuit of Methodists. This cob and brick building was pulled down and replaced by an entirely brick building in 1890. Its location was down a small lane from West Street opposite the Drax Arms, ending not far from the main village church. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Interior of the Church Plenty of flowers in the Church! Maybe it was a harvest festival... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Turberville Tombs You can see the Turberville tombs through this angled photograph. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Church & Brewary Quite an unlikely combination - these two buildings! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Churchyard A verdant churchyard indeed! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Norman Arches & the Font Doesn't that Font look serene? Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Lepers Squint Interesting description on the postcard - 'Lepers squint'... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Church from the north east Look at the strange shaped lamp to the right Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
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© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.

St. John the Baptist Church

Historical photographs

Bere Regis Village Website
Bere Regis Church in about 1900 This fine photograph of the church was taken by Walter Pouncy from the Court Green field across South Brook road. When compared with the church photo taken in the 1860s one can see the new windows at the east end of the South Aisle and the Chancel. Of particular interest also is the size and height of the yew trees planted in the churchyard. Their growth over the next one hundred years has helped to date many photographs in which they appear. Courtesy of John Pitfield
Click / tap image for a larger view Click / tap yellow circle for a larger view All large images appear in a new tab
Church Restoration, Bere Regis in 1875 Again a rather poor image, but one sufficiently unusual for inclusion. This view is from the nave and looking toward the chancel, and the workmen are obviously standing still for the photograph. Indoor photography was certainly a novelty at this time, although it seems that the south aisle roof is off at this time. Total expense of the work carried out on the church in 1875 amounted to 5,090 pounds. This picture was probably taken on the same day as the picture of the West Street Post Office. Courtesy of John Pitfield
Bere Regis Church in 1930 Neatly trimmed Yew trees! Click for the full sized image and see if you can read the sign on the bottom right of the photograph - email us if you can! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Church in the 1860's Probably taken by J.W. Boswell, the village photographer in the 1860s, it shows the church before the restoration in 1875. The two biggest differences before and after restoration are the tops of the two east-facing windows in this view. The south aisle has a square-top window and the chancel window has vertical tracery. Compare this with the next picture taken after 1875. Meanwhile in the right foreground are the out-buildings at the rear of the village brewery in operation from the mid-19th Century, when a gallon of beer would cost one shilling. Courtesy of John Pitfield
The Turberville Chapel & Tombs The Turberville family was made famous by Thomas Hardys book, 'Tess of the D'urbervilles'. Bere Regis is his fabled 'Kingsbere'. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Nave of St. John the Baptist Church around 1912 From the writer of this postcard, "The glory of the church is its timber roof which is gorgeous with the most elaborate carvings." The public sentiment hasn't changed since those musings over 90 years ago... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
St. John The Baptist Church West Window & Font Our lighting is slightly less conspicuous these days! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Nave If you look very closely on the full size image you can even read which hymns & Psalms they had been using! The pattern on the Altar cloth could also give you a hint about what time of year it was. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Looking towards the Nave Look at the wonderful symmetry in the architecture of this church. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Roof Without doubt, the roof, erected by Cardinal Morton, is the highlight of our lovely Church. The 12 Apostles look down on the congregation like 12 indoor beatific gargoyles. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from the South East As the postcard writer noted about the Church, "one of the most beautiful in the county". No arguments there! Note the distinctive tree in the background. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Court Green Notice the brewery to the right of the photograph. That road in front of the Church is somewhat busier now! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Court Green This photograph clearly shows the field that the Church used to look out onto. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The 'D'Urberville' Tomb Me thinks the postcard maker is getting a bit carried away with his Thomas Hardy interest. This is actually the Turberville Family tomb! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church from Southbrook Notice the meadow & gardens the Church looks out over. An interesting example of an early coloured photograph. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
The Church Roof Quite a piece of workmanship considering it was constructed in 1485! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Methodist Chapel, 1890 This fine photograph, taken shortly after completion of the replacement building, was made from a 6.5" x 4.75" glass plate. In 1931 a schoolroom was added at the other, East, end, but in April 1962 the building was sold to a Builders Firm for use as a carpentry workshop. During the 1960s and 1970s the walls were adorned with many pictures and illustrations that the original purpose of the building would not have envisaged. Demolition finally came in the late 1980s to make way for new building developments and housing. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Bere Regis Methodist Chapel in about 1880 Built in 1828 for £120, when the Methodists split from the other church in the village and at a time when various groups worshipped in several different buildings. The description of this post-card view says that this was The First Wesleyan Church, and it was certainly the first in the Dorchester circuit of Methodists. This cob and brick building was pulled down and replaced by an entirely brick building in 1890. Its location was down a small lane from West Street opposite the Drax Arms, ending not far from the main village church. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Interior of the Church Plenty of flowers in the Church! Maybe it was a harvest festival... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Turberville Tombs You can see the Turberville tombs through this angled photograph. Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Church & Brewary Quite an unlikely combination - these two buildings! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Churchyard A verdant churchyard indeed! Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Norman Arches & the Font Doesn't that Font look serene? Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Lepers Squint Interesting description on the postcard - 'Lepers squint'... Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Church from the north east Look at the strange shaped lamp to the right Photograph courtesy of Paul & Alison Bennett
Top of page
more
Page one
© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.