Bere Regis Village Website Bere Regis Village website
Bere Regis Village, Dorset
© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.
Bere Regis Village website

WW1 100 years Remembrance at Bere Regis 2018

WW1 COMMEMORATIONS. It might be worth explaining the rationale behind the ‘silent soldier’ images

around the village.

We decided to design our own rather than go for the standard ones you might have seen elsewhere in order to

personalise them for our community.

The two sentries on the eastern entry to the village represent the 200 or so men from the village who were

involved in the Great War of whom 28 did not return.

On the Bovington road, the soldier in tropical uniform commemorates the men who served in Gallipoli.

The Dorsetshire Regiment had over 300 men killed and 250 men wounded wounded in one day , included 5 men

from Bere Regis killed.

21 August 1915 was dubbed ‘a black day for Dorset.’ The sailor on the Roke Road is a reminder that, although we

tend to focus on the Army casualties, the Royal Navy also suffered some 45,000 casualties, including William Cox

from Bere Regis who was killed together with 1300 shipmates when his ship was sunk at the Battle of Coronel on

1 November 1914.

Many men from Bere Regis also served in the Royal Navy. Finally, the figure of the returning soldier with his two

daughters at Elder Road is a reminder that we are not only commemorating the casualties of the Great War but

also celebrating the return of the survivors and the end of ‘the war to end all wars’.

Sadly, the ‘land fit for heroes’ that many returned to proved to be illusory for most.

Philip Ventham

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

In addition to the usual Parade and Service on Sunday (Parade sets off from the Scout Hut at 10.30 - everyone is

welcome to join the parade)

There is to be a commemorative lighting of a beacon on Soul's Moor in the evening at 7.00pm.

This is part of the national lighting of beacons around the UK.

There will also be a celebratory peal of bells from the church, including the 'PAX' bell hung in the tower at the

end of the War.

Afterwards everyone is welcome to come back to the Scout Hut for soup and rolls (provided by the WI )and to

join in a sing-song of First World War songs. Do come along.

Philip Ventham
I thought Bere Regis village might like to know that Private Alfred Applin (Dorset Regiment) was remembered yesterday in a service at St Paul’s Cathedral. Bere Regis resident Alfred who was my Great Uncle was one of 7 men from the Applin family that fought in WW1. He was a machine gunner and was badly injured. As he convalesced at the Star and Garter home in London he, along with other injured soldiers, embroidered the Altar Frontal for St Pauls Cathedral. (photo left) He died in 1920. I know he is remembered too on your memorial. Heather Frazer
Tap / click to enlarge image
November 11th. 2018. BERE REGIS JOINS WITH CÉRENCES TO REMEMBER A delegation of fourteen people led by Ian Ventham,as Chairman of the Parish Council, and Roger Angel,Chairman of the Bere Regis Twinning Association and Chairman of the Dorset Twinning Associations,attended the Commemoration for the end of the First World War in our twin village of Cérences. Invited by the Mayor M. Jean Paul Payan and the Jumelage of Cérences, this was a formal reciprocal visit following 2014 when they came to us. We all felt that being a part of their community for this event gave us a greater insight into living in an occupied land, the desperation and privation of life  in the First World War as well as the great cost to their commune in losing 68 young men from a community so similar to Bere Regis. We attended their exhibition and a lecture, as well as a civic dinner. Gifts were exchanged and the short speeches from Ian, Roger and Jean-Paul spoke of the past and strength of the future that is the real reason for the bonds that Twinning provides. On Remembrance Sunday we were part of their Parade to Church for a sung Mass followed by the laying of wreaths at the War Memorial,our poppies alongside their flowers. Our National Anthem had been sung in church. The children of the Cérences’ schools read their roll of the dead, so many family names that are familiar to our Twinning members, and the children sang the Marseillaise before releasing balloons, each with the name of a fallen soldier. It was a very moving sight watching so many red, white and blue balloons rising into a blue sky above the church. Four of us attended the annual lunch of The Veterans Association, the equivalent of our Royal British Legion. A great honour and a great strain on our French as no one there spoke English. In his report for the Jumelage de Cérences, Arnaud Dechen, their President wrote,‘…..nous avons surtout organise ce week-end avec tout notre coeur, simplicité etamitié.’ Simple, from our hearts and with love Judy Newton
Bere Regis Village, Dorset
Bere Regis Village Website
© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.

WW1 100 years Remembrance at Bere Regis 2018

WW1 COMMEMORATIONS. It might be worth

explaining the rationale behind the ‘silent soldier’ images

around the village.

We decided to design our own rather than go for the

standard ones you might have seen elsewhere in order to

personalise them for our community.

The two sentries on the eastern entry to the village

represent the 200 or so men from the village who were

involved in the Great War of whom 28 did not return.

On the Bovington road, the soldier in tropical uniform

commemorates the men who served in Gallipoli.

The Dorsetshire Regiment had over 300 men killed and

250 men wounded wounded in one day , included 5 men

from Bere Regis killed.

21 August 1915 was dubbed ‘a black day for Dorset.’ The

sailor on the Roke Road is a reminder that, although we

tend to focus on the Army casualties, the Royal Navy also

suffered some 45,000 casualties, including William Cox

from Bere Regis who was killed together with 1300

shipmates when his ship was sunk at the Battle of

Coronel on 1 November 1914.

Many men from Bere Regis also served in the Royal

Navy. Finally, the figure of the returning soldier with his

two daughters at Elder Road is a reminder that we are

not only commemorating the casualties of the Great War

but also celebrating the return of the survivors and the

end of ‘the war to end all wars’.

Sadly, the ‘land fit for heroes’ that many returned to

proved to be illusory for most.

Philip Ventham

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

In addition to the usual Parade and Service on Sunday

(Parade sets off from the Scout Hut at 10.30 - everyone is

welcome to join the parade)

There is to be a commemorative lighting of a beacon on

Soul's Moor in the evening at 7.00pm.

This is part of the national lighting of beacons around the

UK.

There will also be a celebratory peal of bells from the

church, including the 'PAX' bell hung in the tower at the

end of the War.

Afterwards everyone is welcome to come back to the

Scout Hut for soup and rolls (provided by the WI )and to

join in a sing-song of First World War songs. Do come

along.

Philip Ventham
I thought Bere Regis village might like to know that Private Alfred Applin (Dorset Regiment) was remembered yesterday in a service at St Paul’s Cathedral. Bere Regis resident Alfred who was my Great Uncle was one of 7 men from the Applin family that fought in WW1. He was a machine gunner and was badly injured. As he convalesced at the Star and Garter home in London he, along with other injured soldiers, embroidered the Altar Frontal for St Pauls Cathedral. (photo above) He died in 1920. I know he is remembered too on your memorial. Heather Frazer
Tap / click to enlarge image
November 11th. 2018. BERE REGIS JOINS WITH CÉRENCES TO REMEMBER A delegation of fourteen people led by Ian Ventham,as Chairman of the Parish Council, and Roger Angel,Chairman of the Bere Regis Twinning Association and Chairman of the Dorset Twin- ning Associations,attended the Commemoration for the end of the First World War in our twin village of Cérences. Invited by the Mayor M. Jean Paul Payan and the Jumelage of Cérences, this was a formal reciprocal visit following 2014 when they came to us. We all felt that being a part of their community for this event gave us a greater insight into living in an occupied land, the desperation and privation of life  in the First World War as well as the great cost to their com- mune in losing 68 young men from a community so similar to Bere Regis. We attended their exhibition and a lecture, as well as a civic dinner. Gifts were exchanged and the short speeches from Ian, Roger and Jean-Paul spoke of the past and strength of the future that is the real reason for the bonds that Twinning provides. On Remembrance Sunday we were part of their Parade to Church for a sung Mass followed by the lay- ing of wreaths at the War Memorial,our poppies alongside their flowers. Our National Anthem had been sung in church. The children of the Cérences’ schools read their roll of the dead, so many family names that are familiar to our Twinning members, and the children sang the Marseillaise before releasing balloons, each with the name of a fallen soldier. It was a very moving sight watching so many red, white and blue balloons rising into a blue sky above the church. Four of us attended the annual lunch of The Veterans Association, the equivalent of our Royal British Legion. A great honour and a great strain on our French as no one there spoke English. In his report for the Jumelage de Cérences, Arnaud Dechen, their President wrote,‘…..nous avons surtout organise ce week-end avec tout notre coeur, simplicité etamitié.’ Simple, from our hearts and with love Judy Newton