Bere Regis Village, Dorset
Bere Regis Village Click / tap images to enlarge

Bere Regis Entries in The

Domesday Book

In   1086   King   William   ordered   a   new,   more   detailed   survey   of   his   newly   acquired   Kingdom   in   order   to   asses   its   wealth   and   its   tax   potential.   Officials of   all   Manors   were   required   to   furnish   not   only   details   of   the   amounts   of   ploughland,   meadow,   pasture   and   woodland,   but   the   numbers   of   personnel employed   in   the   form   of   Villeins,   Cottars,   Bodars   and   Serfs   together   with   the   numbers   of   Livestock.   They   had   also   to   state   the   previous   owner   in the time of King Edward (1042-1066), before the Conquest and the present Tenant in Chief (Demesne land) and the sub-tenants (Mesne tenants). The   king   died   before   it   was   completed.   900   years   later   (1986   was   the   900th   anniversary   of   the   publication   of   the   book)   90%   of   the   towns   &   villages still remain. The   original   book   was   hand-written   by,   probably,   a   single   monk.   It   still   exists   and   is   kept   at   the   UK's   Public   Record   Office   in   Kew,   near   London.   It   is kept secure in a metal chest, to be carefully removed every few centuries or so when they need re-binding. The questionnaire sent out for the Domesday survey asked: The name of the place Who held it before 1066 Who holds it now (1085) How many hides (1 hide of 20 acres could support 1 family) How many ploughs How many Lordships How many men How much woodland How much meadow How much pasture How many villages How many cottagers How many slaves How many free men How many Freeman How many mills How many fish ponds What the total value was What the total value is How much each free man or Freeman had or has The   Village   is   mentioned   several   times   in   the   Domesday   Book   in   1086.   You   can   find   an   electronic   scan   of   the   actual   pages   where   it   is   mentioned by   clicking   the   3   Images   below.   Beneath   each   image   is   a   link   to   a   translation   of   each   page.   Further   down   the   Page   you   can   find   Notes   on   the Domesday Entries for different parts of the Parish. Click each image above for for a translation Unlike   the   Geld   Rolls   which   were   listed   by   Hundreds,   the   Domesday   Survey   was   listed   under   the   headings   of   those   who   held   the   land   as   tenants   in chief, so that the two surveys require to be studied together if it is desired to extract the items relating to one particular Hundred. Most   of   the   place   names   in   the   Domesday   Survey   can   be   readily   located   even   when   they   have   undergone   considerable   changes,   but   in   the   case   of all   the   various   Winterbourne   villages   along   the   two   Dorset   streams   of   the   same   name,   they   are   almost   all   called   simply   Wintreburne.   It   is   therefore not   possible   to   identify   many   of   them   with   certainty   and   Winterborne   Kingston,   known   to   have   been   in   Bere   Hundred,   is   not   on   this   account   referred to   in   the   following   notes   on   the   Domesday   entries.   Places   which   were   in   the   Hundred   but   which   do   not   now   come   within   the   present   parish   are dealt with more briefly. A. The Royal Manor. Held by the King, it hidage is not known as it was not referred to as an individual manor. B.   Scetra   or   Scetre   (Shitterton).   This   seems   to   have   been   temporarily   a   royal   manor   at   the   time   of   Domesday.   Ulviet   had   held   it   before   the conquest   and   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   had   held   it   subsequently.   It   contained   5   hides   of   which   the   King   held   3   1/2   in   demesne   and   the   villeins   held   1/2   hide. There   was   arable   land   for   4   ploughs   of   which   the   King   held   1   and   the   villeins   1.   There   were   4   acres   of   meadow,   pasture   2   furlongs   x2   furlongs, woodland   3   furlongs   x3   furlongs,   6   villeins,   3   bordars,   5   serfs,   20   pigs   and   120   sheep.   It   was   worth   100s.   (£5)   a   year,   but   it   had   been   worth   £6   a year when Hugh Fitz Grip first received it. C.   The   Churches   of   Dorchestre   (Dorchester)   and   Bere.   For   some   reason   these   two   church   lands   were   dealt   with   together.   Bristuard   the   priest   held them and their tithes, containing in all 1 hide and 20 acres and worth £4 a year. D.   Bere   (Doddingsbere,   now   Doddings   Farm).   Containing   1/2   hide   and   held   by   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   as   chief   tenant.   William   (De   Monasteriis) was   sub-tenant   and   Leomer   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   There   was   a   mill   rendering   20s.   (£1)   a   year,   arable   land   for   1/2   plough,   6   acres   of meadow, 6 acres of pasture, 1 bordar, 10 beasts, 45 sheep, 28 pigs and 1 pack-horse. The manor was worth 30s. (£1.50) a year. It   is   stated,   as   a   separate   entry,   presumably   still   relating   to   Doddings,   that   William   held   1   1/2   virgates   from   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip,   worth   20s. (£1) a year. E. Affapidele (Affpuddle). Containing 9 hides and held by the Abbot of Cerne both before and after the conquest. F.   Pidele   (Turnerspuddle   or   Tonerspuddle).   Containing   6   hides   and   held   by   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   as   chief   tenant.   Walter   Tonitruus   (origin   of Tonerspuddle?) was sub-tenant and Gerling had held it before the conquest. G. Pidele (Briantspuddle). Containing 5 hides and held by Godric the priest., Azor had held it before the conquest. H.   Meleburne   or   Meleborne   (Milborne   Stileham).   Part   1:-   Containing   2   hides   and   held   by   Odo   Fitz   Eurebold.   Dodo   had   held   it   before   the   conquest. Part 2 :- Held by Swain as chief tenant. Osmund was sub-tenant and Swain's father had held it before the conquest. I. Bovintone (Bovington). Containing 4 hides and held by Alvric who had also held it before the conquest. J.   Beastewelle   (Bestwall   Farm   in   Wareham   Lady   St.   Mary   Parish).   Containing   3   hides   and   held   in   demesne   by   the   Count   of   Mortain.   Edmar   had held it before the conquest. K. Aelfatune   or   Hafeltone   (Hethfelton   in   East   Stoke   Parish).   Part   1   :-   Containing   3   virgates   (3/4   hide)   and   held   in   demesne   by   the Abbot   of   Cerne both   before   and   after   the   conquest.   Part   2   :-   Containing   2   hides   and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief   tenant.   Robert   was   sub-tenant   and Aedelflete   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   Part   3   :-   Containing   1   1/2   hides   and   held   in   demesne   by Alulf   the   Chamberlain. Azor   had   held   it   before the conquest. L.   Ristone   (Rushton   in   East   Stoke   Parish).   Part   1   :-   Containing   1   1/2   hides   and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief   tenant.   Walter   was   sun-tenant and   Burde   had   held   it   before   the   conquest. As   a   matter   of   interest   it   rendered   each   year   30s.   (£1.50)   and   4   sesters   of   honey.   Part   2   :-   Containing   3 virgates   (3/4   hide)   and   held   by   Odo   Fitz   Eurebold.   Part   3   :-   Containing   1/2   hide   and   held   by   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   as   chief   tenant. Two   Knights, one   of   them   named   Turold,   were   sub-tenant   and   3   thanes   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   Part   4   :-   Containing   1   virgate   (1/4   hide)   and   held   by Ailward. Part 5 :- Containing 1 hide (less 1/2 virgate) and held by Edric. Sawin had held it before the conquest. M.   Vergroh,   Weregrote   or   Wiregrote   (Worgret   in   Arne   Parish).   Part   1   :-   Containing   1   hide   and   held   in   demesne   by   the   Abbot   of   Cerne.   Part   2   :- Containing   1   3/4   hides   and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief   tenant.   Walter   was   sub-tenant   and   Brictuin   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   Part   3   :- Containing 1 virgate (1/4 hide) and held by Hugh Gosbert. Almar had held it before the conquest.
Bere Regis Village website
© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.
Bere Regis Village
Bere Regis Village Website

Bere Regis Entries in The Domesday Book

Click / tap images to enlarge
In   1086   King   William   ordered   a   new,   more   detailed   survey   of   his   newly acquired   Kingdom   in   order   to   asses   its   wealth   and   its   tax   potential. Officials   of   all   Manors   were   required   to   furnish   not   only   details   of   the amounts    of    ploughland,    meadow,    pasture    and    woodland,    but    the numbers    of    personnel    employed    in    the    form    of    Villeins,    Cottars, Bodars   and   Serfs   together   with   the   numbers   of   Livestock.   They   had also   to   state   the   previous   owner   in   the   time   of   King   Edward   (1042- 1066),    before    the    Conquest    and    the    present    Tenant    in    Chief (Demesne land) and the sub-tenants (Mesne tenants). The   king   died   before   it   was   completed.   900   years   later   (1986   was   the 900th   anniversary   of   the   publication   of   the   book)   90%   of   the   towns   & villages still remain. The   original   book   was   hand-written   by,   probably,   a   single   monk.   It   still exists   and   is   kept   at   the   UK's   Public   Record   Office   in   Kew,   near London.   It   is   kept   secure   in   a   metal   chest,   to   be   carefully   removed every few centuries or so when they need re-binding. The questionnaire sent out for the Domesday survey asked: The name of the place Who held it before 1066 Who holds it now (1085) How many hides (1 hide of 20 acres could support 1 family) How many ploughs How many Lordships How many men How much woodland How much meadow How much pasture How many villages How many cottagers How many slaves How many free men How many Freeman How many mills How many fish ponds What the total value was What the total value is How much each free man or Freeman had or has The   Village   is   mentioned   several   times   in   the   Domesday   Book   in 1086.   You   can   find   an   electronic   scan   of   the   actual   pages   where   it   is mentioned   by   clicking   the   3   Images   below.   Beneath   each   image   is   a link   to   a   translation   of   each   page.   Further   down   the   Page   you   can   find Notes on the Domesday Entries for different parts of the Parish. Click each image above for for a translation Unlike   the   Geld   Rolls   which   were   listed   by   Hundreds,   the   Domesday Survey   was   listed   under   the   headings   of   those   who   held   the   land   as tenants   in   chief,   so   that   the   two   surveys   require   to   be   studied   together if it is desired to extract the items relating to one particular Hundred. Most   of   the   place   names   in   the   Domesday   Survey   can   be   readily located   even   when   they   have   undergone   considerable   changes,   but   in the   case   of   all   the   various   Winterbourne   villages   along   the   two   Dorset streams    of    the    same    name,    they    are    almost    all    called    simply Wintreburne.   It   is   therefore   not   possible   to   identify   many   of   them   with certainty    and    Winterborne    Kingston,    known    to    have    been    in    Bere Hundred,   is   not   on   this   account   referred   to   in   the   following   notes   on the   Domesday   entries.   Places   which   were   in   the   Hundred   but   which do not now come within the present parish are dealt with more briefly. A. The   Royal   Manor.   Held   by   the   King,   it   hidage   is   not   known   as   it   was not referred to as an individual manor. B.   Scetra   or   Scetre   (Shitterton).   This   seems   to   have   been   temporarily a   royal   manor   at   the   time   of   Domesday.   Ulviet   had   held   it   before   the conquest   and   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   had   held   it   subsequently.   It   contained   5 hides   of   which   the   King   held   3   1/2   in   demesne   and   the   villeins   held   1/2 hide.   There   was   arable   land   for   4   ploughs   of   which   the   King   held   1 and   the   villeins   1.   There   were   4   acres   of   meadow,   pasture   2   furlongs x2   furlongs,   woodland   3   furlongs   x3   furlongs,   6   villeins,   3   bordars,   5 serfs,   20   pigs   and   120   sheep.   It   was   worth   100s.   (£5)   a   year,   but   it   had been worth £6 a year when Hugh Fitz Grip first received it. C.   The   Churches   of   Dorchestre   (Dorchester)   and   Bere.   For   some reason   these   two   church   lands   were   dealt   with   together.   Bristuard   the priest   held   them   and   their   tithes,   containing   in   all   1   hide   and   20   acres and worth £4 a year. D.   Bere   (Doddingsbere,   now   Doddings   Farm).   Containing   1/2   hide   and held    by    the    wife    of    Hugh    Fitz    Grip    as    chief    tenant.    William    (De Monasteriis)    was    sub-tenant    and    Leomer    had    held    it    before    the conquest.   There   was   a   mill   rendering   20s.   (£1)   a   year,   arable   land   for 1/2   plough,   6   acres   of   meadow,   6   acres   of   pasture,   1   bordar,   10 beasts,   45   sheep,   28   pigs   and   1   pack-horse.   The   manor   was   worth 30s. (£1.50) a year. It   is   stated,   as   a   separate   entry,   presumably   still   relating   to   Doddings, that   William   held   1   1/2   virgates   from   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip,   worth 20s. (£1) a year. E. Affapidele   (Affpuddle).   Containing   9   hides   and   held   by   the Abbot   of Cerne both before and after the conquest. F.   Pidele   (Turnerspuddle   or   Tonerspuddle).   Containing   6   hides   and held   by   the   wife   of   Hugh   Fitz   Grip   as   chief   tenant.   Walter   Tonitruus (origin    of    Tonerspuddle?)    was    sub-tenant    and    Gerling    had    held    it before the conquest. G.   Pidele   (Briantspuddle).   Containing   5   hides   and   held   by   Godric   the priest., Azor had held it before the conquest. H.   Meleburne   or   Meleborne   (Milborne   Stileham).   Part   1:-   Containing   2 hides   and   held   by   Odo   Fitz   Eurebold.   Dodo   had   held   it   before   the conquest.   Part   2   :-   Held   by   Swain   as   chief   tenant.   Osmund   was   sub- tenant and Swain's father had held it before the conquest. I.   Bovintone   (Bovington).   Containing   4   hides   and   held   by   Alvric   who had also held it before the conquest. J.   Beastewelle   (Bestwall   Farm   in   Wareham   Lady   St.   Mary   Parish). Containing   3   hides   and   held   in   demesne   by   the   Count   of   Mortain. Edmar had held it before the conquest. K.   Aelfatune   or   Hafeltone   (Hethfelton   in   East   Stoke   Parish).   Part   1   :- Containing   3   virgates   (3/4   hide)   and   held   in   demesne   by   the   Abbot   of Cerne   both   before   and   after   the   conquest.   Part   2   :-   Containing   2   hides and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief   tenant.   Robert   was   sub-tenant and   Aedelflete   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   Part   3   :-   Containing   1 1/2   hides   and   held   in   demesne   by   Alulf   the   Chamberlain.   Azor   had held it before the conquest. L.   Ristone   (Rushton   in   East   Stoke   Parish).   Part   1   :-   Containing   1   1/2 hides   and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief   tenant.   Walter   was   sun- tenant   and   Burde   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   As   a   matter   of interest   it   rendered   each   year   30s.   (£1.50)   and   4   sesters   of   honey. Part    2    :-    Containing    3    virgates    (3/4    hide)    and    held    by    Odo    Fitz Eurebold.   Part   3   :-   Containing   1/2   hide   and   held   by   the   wife   of   Hugh Fitz   Grip   as   chief   tenant.   Two   Knights,   one   of   them   named   Turold, were   sub-tenant   and   3   thanes   had   held   it   before   the   conquest.   Part   4 :-    Containing    1    virgate    (1/4    hide)    and    held    by   Ailward.    Part    5    :- Containing   1   hide   (less   1/2   virgate)   and   held   by   Edric.   Sawin   had   held it before the conquest. M.   Vergroh,   Weregrote   or   Wiregrote   (Worgret   in Arne   Parish).   Part   1   :- Containing   1   hide   and   held   in   demesne   by   the Abbot   of   Cerne.   Part   2 :-   Containing   1   3/4   hides   and   held   by   William   of   Briouze   as   chief tenant.   Walter   was   sub-tenant   and   Brictuin   had   held   it   before   the conquest.   Part   3   :-   Containing   1   virgate   (1/4   hide)   and   held   by   Hugh Gosbert. Almar had held it before the conquest.
© 2003, Bere Regis Village Website.